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Waynesboro Outlet Village

Part 1 – Part 2

Part 2

The Outlet Village contained two sets of public restrooms.  One set was adjacent to Building 2, and another was adjacent to Building 9 (shown here).  Perhaps in order to simplify maintenance, the restrooms adjacent to Building 9 were closed.

The Outlet Village contained two sets of public restrooms.  One set was adjacent to Building 2, and another was adjacent to Building 9 (shown here).  Perhaps in order to simplify maintenance, the restrooms adjacent to Building 9 were closed.


Over the course of the nineteen years that the Outlet Village was in operation, only one major change was made to the footpath through the complex.  This involved navigation around Building 10.  The original path took shoppers past Building 9.  The path was later rerouted around the other side of Building 10, away from Building 9.

Over the course of the nineteen years that the Outlet Village was in operation, only one major change was made to the footpath through the complex.  This involved navigation around Building 10.  The original path took shoppers past Building 9.  The path was later rerouted around the other side of Building 10, away from Building 9.


Building 9 is an unusual case, because with only two exceptions, the area around the building was barricaded off with a tall wooden fence.

Building 9 is an unusual case, because with only two exceptions, the area around the building was barricaded off with a tall wooden fence.


The fence was an obvious addition, and served to separate Building 9, save for a set of restrooms and one store, from the rest of the facility.  It is unknown when the fence was constructed, nor why the fence was constructed, but the fence existed since at least 1997.  The fence was an obvious addition, and served to separate Building 9, save for a set of restrooms and one store, from the rest of the facility.  It is unknown when the fence was constructed, nor why the fence was constructed, but the fence existed since at least 1997.

The fence was an obvious addition, and served to separate Building 9, save for a set of restrooms and one store, from the rest of the facility.  It is unknown when the fence was constructed, nor why the fence was constructed, but the fence existed since at least 1997.

The fence was an obvious addition, and served to separate Building 9, save for a set of restrooms and one store, from the rest of the facility.  It is unknown when the fence was constructed, nor why the fence was constructed, but the fence existed since at least 1997.  The fence was an obvious addition, and served to separate Building 9, save for a set of restrooms and one store, from the rest of the facility.  It is unknown when the fence was constructed, nor why the fence was constructed, but the fence existed since at least 1997.


Building 10, unlike most of the other buildings, was designed to house a single store.


Inside Building 10, one finds a store with wood paneling on the walls, a raised area to the rear, and a green carpet.  The name of the former tenant is unknown.

Inside Building 10, one finds a store with wood paneling on the walls, a raised area to the rear, and a green carpet.  The name of the former tenant is unknown.


Building 11 showed signs of life, as Tile Visions, owned by local businessman Paul Gayda, was located here.

Building 11 showed signs of life, as Tile Visions, owned by local businessman Paul Gayda, was located here.

Building 11 showed signs of life, as Tile Visions, owned by local businessman Paul Gayda, was located here.


This sign, advertising leasing opportunities in the Outlet Village, was located in a window in Building 11.  I found this sign to be somewhat amusing, considering that the Outlet Village's fate was nearly sealed at the time this photo set was made.

This sign, advertising leasing opportunities in the Outlet Village, was located in a window in Building 11.  I found this sign to be somewhat amusing, considering that the Outlet Village’s fate was nearly sealed at the time this photo set was made.


In another building, various equipment sits in storage.  The combination trash can and ashtray units were formerly located outside all along the walkway, and the brown boxes with the green bases are believed to have come from the former Bass Shoes space.

In another building, various equipment sits in storage.  The combination trash can and ashtray units were formerly located outside all along the walkway, and the brown boxes with the green bases are believed to have come from the former Bass Shoes space.


Building 12 was one that I visited many times in my teenage years, as my mother was quite fond of the Bass Shoes outlet once housed within.  The Bass Shoes outlet originally contained a direct connection to the adjacent Van Heusen outlet.  When the Van Heusen store closed, a wall was constructed to separate the former Van Heusen space from the still operating Bass Shoes.

Building 12 was one that I visited many times in my teenage years, as my mother was quite fond of the Bass Shoes outlet once housed within.  The Bass Shoes outlet originally contained a direct connection to the adjacent Van Heusen outlet.  When the Van Heusen store closed, a wall was constructed to separate the former Van Heusen space from the still operating Bass Shoes.


The interior of the former Bass Shoes outlet, like most of the other abandoned stores, is dark, quiet, and empty.

The interior of the former Bass Shoes outlet, like most of the other abandoned stores, is dark, quiet, and empty.


The center of the Outlet Village was a service area, officially designated as Building 17.  Access was restricted to authorized personnel only, which prevented patrons from making a direct crossing from one side of the complex to the other.  Thus in order to get from one end to the other, patrons had to take the longer walk all the way around.  The center of the Outlet Village was a service area, officially designated as Building 17.  Access was restricted to authorized personnel only, which prevented patrons from making a direct crossing from one side of the complex to the other.  Thus in order to get from one end to the other, patrons had to take the longer walk all the way around.

The center of the Outlet Village was a service area, officially designated as Building 17.  Access was restricted to authorized personnel only, which prevented patrons from making a direct crossing from one side of the complex to the other.  Thus in order to get from one end to the other, patrons had to take the longer walk all the way around.


The center area had two access points - one between Buildings 11 and 13 (seen at left), and one further around, between Buildings 15 and 16.  The center area had two access points - one between Buildings 11 and 13 (seen at left), and one further around, between Buildings 15 and 16.

The center area had two access points – one between Buildings 11 and 13 (seen at left), and one further around, between Buildings 15 and 16.


Building 12 was perhaps best known in the facility's early years for a store called "Fannie Farmer", which served ice cream.  It was one of only two places to eat in the complex, with the other being in Building 1.

Building 12 was perhaps best known in the facility’s early years for a store called “Fannie Farmer”, which served ice cream.  It was one of only two places to eat in the complex, with the other being in Building 1.


Building 13 was once, like most of the buildings in the facility's heyday, fully occupied.  By 2006, the occupant list had dwindled down to one.

Building 13 was once, like most of the buildings in the facility’s heyday, fully occupied.  By 2006, the occupant list had dwindled down to one.


One store in Building 13 that lasted into the mid-1990s was the Bugle Boy outlet, whose former space is like most of the others - dark and empty.

One store in Building 13 that lasted into the mid-1990s was the Bugle Boy outlet, whose former space is like most of the others – dark and empty.


However, the other end of Building 13 showed some definite signs of life.

However, the other end of Building 13 showed some definite signs of life.


The Liz Claiborne outlet was the single remaining outlet store in the facility.  Of all the factory outlet stores that once filled the Outlet Village, this was now the last one.

The Liz Claiborne outlet was the single remaining outlet store in the facility.  Of all the factory outlet stores that once filled the Outlet Village, this was now the last one.


The store was also somewhat busy, as they were having a "Final Sale" to make way for newer inventory.  This was not a going-out-of-business sale, as I had expected when seeing "Final Sale" in the windows.  The store was also somewhat busy, as they were having a "Final Sale" to make way for newer inventory.  This was not a going-out-of-business sale, as I had expected when seeing "Final Sale" in the windows.

The store was also somewhat busy, as they were having a “Final Sale” to make way for newer inventory.  This was not a going-out-of-business sale, as I had expected when seeing “Final Sale” in the windows.


Building 15 housed a local favorite within its walls, as 15A was the home of the Paper Factory, which was a party supplies store operated by Party America.  Building 15 housed a local favorite within its walls, as 15A was the home of the Paper Factory, which was a party supplies store operated by Party America.

Building 15 housed a local favorite within its walls, as 15A was the home of the Paper Factory, which was a party supplies store operated by Party America.

Building 15 housed a local favorite within its walls, as 15A was the home of the Paper Factory, which was a party supplies store operated by Party America.


Across from the Paper Factory, Building 14, like Building 10, was designed to hold a single store.  Unlike many of the empty stores, some fixtures still exist in this space from its last use, though the identity of the former occupant is unknown.

Across from the Paper Factory, Building 14, like Building 10, was designed to hold a single store.  Unlike many of the empty stores, some fixtures still exist in this space from its last use, though the identity of the former occupant is unknown.


Part of Building 16 was most recently the former home of the Augusta County Railroad Museum.  This is also believed to be the former location of Toy Liquidators, a toy outlet store which existed during the Outlet Village's heyday.

Part of Building 16 was most recently the former home of the Augusta County Railroad Museum.  This is also believed to be the former location of Toy Liquidators, a toy outlet store which existed during the Outlet Village’s heyday.


Finally, another part of Building 16 housed the Virginia Metalcrafters store.  This space was one of only two spaces in the Outlet Village (with the other being Building 1 housing the Artisans Center) to have an outward-facing storefront.

Finally, another part of Building 16 housed the Virginia Metalcrafters store.  This space was one of only two spaces in the Outlet Village (with the other being Building 1 housing the Artisans Center) to have an outward-facing storefront.


This area was originally designed for buses to load and unload passengers, but with the arrival of Virginia Metalcrafters, the area was divided up for use as parking for Virginia Metalcrafters customers.  This made Virginia Metalcrafters the only store where people could park right by the door.

This area was originally designed for buses to load and unload passengers, but with the arrival of Virginia Metalcrafters, the area was divided up for use as parking for Virginia Metalcrafters customers.  This made Virginia Metalcrafters the only store where people could park right by the door.

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