Photography

Photography from 2017

Photography from 2016

Photography from 2015

Photography from 2014

Photography from 2013

Photography from 2012

Photography from 2011

Photography from 2010

Photography from 2009

Photography from 2008

Photography from 2006

Photography from 2005

Photography from 2004

Photography from 2003

Photography from 2002

Photography from 2001

Photography from 2000

The White House in Snow

Amazing how things work out sometimes, don’t you think?  This set was made on Saturday, February 8, 2003.  It had snowed enough to close JMU on the day before my trip, putting the trip’s status in jeopardy due to weather conditions.  However, by noon on that Friday, the roads were perfect.  So I went off to Washington DC as planned.

When I was planning this particular trip, I asked a few friends what they wanted to see.  One friend said he wanted to see the White House.  I said, “Sure!”  So this is the White House, a gorgeous building to begin with, and even more gorgeous when surrounded by a layer of snow…


The first decent view of the White House is through trees... some are historic, attributed to specific presidents, and some are simply there.

The first decent view of the White House is through trees… some are historic, attributed to specific presidents, and some are simply there.


The South Portico and the South Lawn are a sight to behold to begin with, and when covered with snow, the scene is really just breathtaking.

The South Portico and the South Lawn are a sight to behold to begin with, and when covered with snow, the scene is really just breathtaking.

The South Portico and the South Lawn are a sight to behold to begin with, and when covered with snow, the scene is really just breathtaking.


To the right in this picture, we find the East Terrace, originally built in Jefferson's day, demolished in the mid-1800s, rebuilt in 1902, and now leading to the East Wing.  Outside of it, and unfortunately not visible in this shot, is the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden.

To the right in this picture, we find the East Terrace, originally built in Jefferson’s day, demolished in the mid-1800s, rebuilt in 1902, and now leading to the East Wing.  Outside of it, and unfortunately not visible in this shot, is the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden.


Next door to the White House is the Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building, historically known as the Old Executive Office Building.

Next door to the White House is the Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building, historically known as the Old Executive Office Building.


As you can see, the Old Executive Office Building is built in a considerably different style than the White House.

As you can see, the Old Executive Office Building is built in a considerably different style than the White House.

As you can see, the Old Executive Office Building is built in a considerably different style than the White House.


Continuing around the complex to reach Pennsylvania Avenue, we find the West Wing, with a large amount of photographic equipment nearby.

Continuing around the complex to reach Pennsylvania Avenue, we find the West Wing, with a large amount of photographic equipment nearby.

Continuing around the complex to reach Pennsylvania Avenue, we find the West Wing, with a large amount of photographic equipment nearby.


In looking closely at the equipment, one finds that this is all news equipment, finding "CNN" on the umbrella in the far right of the picture, and finding "Fox News" on another.

In looking closely at the equipment, one finds that this is all news equipment, finding “CNN” on the umbrella in the far right of the picture, and finding “Fox News” on another.


Going past the West Wing, we again reach the main building.  Note the "fan" window on the west side.

Going past the West Wing, we again reach the main building.  Note the “fan” window on the west side.


The major feature on this side of the White House is the North Portico, constructed in 1829 during the administration of Andrew Jackson, otherwise known as "Old Hickory".

The major feature on this side of the White House is the North Portico, constructed in 1829 during the administration of Andrew Jackson, otherwise known as “Old Hickory”.

The major feature on this side of the White House is the North Portico, constructed in 1829 during the administration of Andrew Jackson, otherwise known as "Old Hickory".


Interestingly enough, the snow was so bright as to cause the White House to appear dark by comparison!

Interestingly enough, the snow was so bright as to cause the White House to appear dark by comparison!


The North Portico originally was used as the White House's main entrance, but soon proved to be inadequate, creating the need to erect bridges from State Floor windows to allow for traffic flow.  Since 1902, visitors enter the White House through the East Wing.

The North Portico originally was used as the White House’s main entrance, but soon proved to be inadequate, creating the need to erect bridges from State Floor windows to allow for traffic flow.  Since 1902, visitors enter the White House through the East Wing.


The North Portico is really a beautiful sight... I still find it amazing that before 1829, there was no North Portico, since it so belongs with the White House.  Also, in 1948 and for 27 years thereafter, this area was watched over by a statue of Thomas Jefferson.

The North Portico is really a beautiful sight… I still find it amazing that before 1829, there was no North Portico, since it so belongs with the White House.  Also, in 1948 and for 27 years thereafter, this area was watched over by a statue of Thomas Jefferson.


Looking further down Pennsylvania Avenue, we find the East Wing.  According to a White House Police officer, this area was being remodeled.  Note that part of the East Wing is not white at the time this picture was taken, in contrast to other parts of the building visible in this picture.

Looking further down Pennsylvania Avenue, we find the East Wing.  According to a White House Police officer, this area was being remodeled.  Note that part of the East Wing is not white at the time this picture was taken, in contrast to other parts of the building visible in this picture.


The White House looks amazingly similar to how it looked back in its early days, thanks to the efforts of many, who, when enlarging the White House, did so by low-lying structures vs. huge wings.

The White House looks amazingly similar to how it looked back in its early days, thanks to the efforts of many, who, when enlarging the White House, did so by low-lying structures vs. huge wings.


And lastly, the east side.  Interestingly enough, all four "regular" windows on the State Floor on the east side are false windows, having been walled in long ago based on a plan by Benjamin Henry Latrobe.

And lastly, the east side.  Interestingly enough, all four “regular” windows on the State Floor on the east side are false windows, having been walled in long ago based on a plan by Benjamin Henry Latrobe.


In front of the White House, Pennsylvania Avenue had been closed to vehicular traffic for security considerations during the Clinton administration.  This had a major benefit for activist groups.  It gave activist groups a larger space to peacefully protest outside the White House.  This particular group appears to be people originally from the Ivory Coast, encouraging the President to say no to United Nations Security Council Resolution 1479, also known as the Linas-Marcoussis Agreement.

In front of the White House, Pennsylvania Avenue had been closed to vehicular traffic for security considerations during the Clinton administration.  This had a major benefit for activist groups.  It gave activist groups a larger space to peacefully protest outside the White House.  This particular group appears to be people originally from the Ivory Coast, encouraging the President to say no to United Nations Security Council Resolution 1479, also known as the Linas-Marcoussis Agreement.


In a stationary position across the street, is an anti-nuclear peace vigil, having been going on for 24 hours a day since 1981.

In a stationary position across the street, is an anti-nuclear peace vigil, having been going on for 24 hours a day since 1981.


On the sidewalk immediately next to the White House fence, a group of women organized under the name Code Pink was protesting the then-upcoming war with Iraq.

On the sidewalk immediately next to the White House fence, a group of women organized under the name Code Pink was protesting the then-upcoming war with Iraq.

On the sidewalk immediately next to the White House fence, a group of women organized under the name Code Pink was protesting the then-upcoming war with Iraq.

Comments are closed.