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Funk the Weekend

Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3 – Part 4 – Part 5 – Part 6 – Part 7 – Part 8

Part 2

Arriving at the recruitment center...

Arriving at the recruitment center…

Arriving at the recruitment center...


Cops blocking off the entrance to the recruitment center.  Cops blocking off the entrance to the recruitment center.

Cops blocking off the entrance to the recruitment center.


A woman's bicycle carries a sign with the classic phrase, "Bombing for peace is like f---ing for virginity".

A woman’s bicycle carries a sign with the classic phrase, “Bombing for peace is like f—ing for virginity”.


Demonstrating outside the recruitment center.  Demonstrating outside the recruitment center.

Demonstrating outside the recruitment center.


And documenting the demonstration for posterity.

And documenting the demonstration for posterity.


And then someone threw a glass container filled with yellow paint (commonly referred to as a “paint bomb”) at the building.  It struck the window, leaving a large splat of paint on the window.  That changed the entire tone of the demonstration.  The cops quickly located the alleged thrower, and arrested him.  Meanwhile, MPDC Captain Jeff Herold, using a bullhorn, declared our march an unlawful assembly and everyone was forced out of the street.  I, being a few years older than most of the demonstrators, and looking a bit older than them as well, was allowed to get out of the street on my own without being hurried or pushed, though the only place where I had space to get onto the sidewalk was by going into a small patch of flowers by a tree.


As the person who allegedly threw the paint is arrested, Herold declares the march an unlawful assembly and orders everyone out of the street.


Paint on the recruitment center's window.

Paint on the recruitment center’s window.


Standing in the flowers.  My sincerest apologies to whoever's work I just trampled.  Believe me when I say that I would have avoided the flowers if I was able to.

Standing in the flowers.  My sincerest apologies to whoever’s work I just trampled.  Believe me when I say that I would have avoided the flowers if I was able to.


It is worth noting here that while Herold did declare the demonstration unlawful, he did not order the demonstration to disperse, as has been done for previous declarations of an unlawful assembly, such as at the Georgetown march during October Rebellion, and the nighttime phase of the G20 demonstrations.  The march was allowed to continue intact, however, we were no longer allowed to march in the street.

Honestly, the paint at the recruiter’s office really did more harm than good as far as the demonstration went.  It changed the mood of the demonstration, and Funk the War demonstrations are often fairly calm events, with the emphasis on having a good time while protesting the wars.  Now the cops had reason to believe that we were up to no good, and treated us as such.  Additionally, by the choice of yellow paint, any symbolism in the act was removed.  If the paint were red, then at least it would have symbolized blood, which would have made sense at an anti-war protest.  With the paint’s being yellow, it just looked like petty vandalism, and gave Funk the War a bad name.  All that came of it was an arrest and a declaration of unlawful assembly.


A second demonstrator was also detained at this point, allegedly for putting a sticker on a car.  While the crowd shouted "Let Kris go!" the demonstrator was given a citation and released back into the crowd.

A second demonstrator was also detained at this point, allegedly for putting a sticker on a car.  While the crowd shouted “Let Kris go!” the demonstrator was given a citation and released back into the crowd.


“LET KRIS GO!  LET KRIS GO!”


Kris is released back into the crowd after receiving a citation.  Kris is released back into the crowd after receiving a citation.

Kris is released back into the crowd after receiving a citation.


Police activity in the street after the demonstrators were moved to the sidewalk.  Police activity in the street after the demonstrators were moved to the sidewalk.

Police activity in the street after the demonstrators were moved to the sidewalk.

Police activity in the street after the demonstrators were moved to the sidewalk.  Police activity in the street after the demonstrators were moved to the sidewalk.


Lacy MacAuley shouts while at the recruitment center.

Lacy MacAuley shouts while at the recruitment center.


Leaving the recruitment center, we headed west, on the sidewalk.  The march was still pretty festive, and while one of our people had been arrested (and admittedly for doing something kind of dumb), we were pleased that Kris had not been arrested.


Underway again, now on the sidewalk.  Underway again, now on the sidewalk.

Underway again, now on the sidewalk.

Underway again, now on the sidewalk.  Underway again, now on the sidewalk.

Underway again, now on the sidewalk.  Underway again, now on the sidewalk.


Leaving anarchy signs on the sidewalk in chalk.

Leaving anarchy signs on the sidewalk in chalk.


On the way to our next target, one person commented to Herold about how they weren’t being permitted to march in the street, and that they were “just kids”.  Herold had a snappy response to that one, saying, “Children who throw things have to stay on the sidewalk.”

We eventually ended up at the United States Chamber of Commerce, where, in repeat-after-me form, the group read a breakup letter outside the building.


Reading the breakup letter.


From there, we headed south into Lafayette Park, still taking great care to remain on the sidewalk.  We turned left onto Pennsylvania Avenue, passing by a row of tourists.  In typical form, many in the group encouraged the tourists to join us.  After all, what better way to experience a trip to Washington than to see democracy in action?  Flex that First Amendment, yo.

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Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3 – Part 4 – Part 5 – Part 6 – Part 7 – Part 8

Part 2