Life and Times

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Life and Times from 2008

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Year of Many Cameras

Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3

Part 1

When I looked back on 2008, one thing stuck out in my mind – I took photos with a lot of different equipment in 2008.  Big Mavica bit the dust at Funk the War 3 in March, and Duckie and the Kodak arrived to take Big Mavica’s place.  I also used my cell phone camera quite a bit, and upgraded that in May to a newer model.  Thus over the course of 2008, I was working on five different cameras, albeit not all at the same time.

And through all the changes in equipment, time marched on, as a lot happened in 2008.  You may remember some of these events from various Journal entries over the course of the year, but some stuff you may not.  So come join me, as we remember the year 2008…


My office in 2008, shortly after we moved to a new office suite.  This was an early photo, considering the white iMac on my desk (I later got a 24" aluminum iMac).

My office in 2008, shortly after we moved to a new office suite.  This was an early photo, considering the white iMac on my desk (I later got a 24″ aluminum iMac).


The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.  The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.

The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.

The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.  The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.

The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.  The protest outside the Canadian embassy against oil extraction in the Alberta Tar Sands was fun and spirited.  It was very cold on this particular night, but the activists present were a dedicated bunch.


“Canada’s soil, not your oil!”


Playing "O Canada" into the bullhorn, on the kazoo.

Playing “O Canada” into the bullhorn, on the kazoo.


“O Canada, O Canada, keep your dirty oil!”


It is worth noting that the Tar Sands protest was Big Mavica’s next-to-last shoot, and the final successful shoot from start to finish (Big Mavica would be damaged beyond repair at its next shoot, Funk the War 3).  Big Mavica really started to show its age with this shoot, though, as the disc drive was taking longer to save images than it used to, and I managed to deplete all three batteries in the span of about an hour.  That can be partly attributed to the cold and heavy flash use at the Tar Sands protest, but even then, such short battery time was really quite unheard of for Big Mavica…


When Katie and I got together in Leesburg while she was out visiting family, we took a moment to locate an Italian restaurant that Mom and I had visited in 2007.  At that time, Mom was staying in Dulles for a writing conference, and I had just finished up with October Rebellion earlier that day.  The Italian restaurant was quite good, though I found its format somewhat odd, as it came off as a mix of a "real" restaurant and a fast-food restaurant.

When Katie and I got together in Leesburg while she was out visiting family, we took a moment to locate an Italian restaurant that Mom and I had visited in 2007.  At that time, Mom was staying in Dulles for a writing conference, and I had just finished up with October Rebellion earlier that day.  The Italian restaurant was quite good, though I found its format somewhat odd, as it came off as a mix of a “real” restaurant and a fast-food restaurant.


During my morning commute on March 18, I spotted a broken pole on Rohr 1051.  I generally report maintenance concerns such as these to Metro, and so I photographed it with my cell phone in order to be able to accurately describe it on Metro's comment form once I got near a computer.  A friend of mine, in seeing the photo at right where I am trying to photograph the far side of the broken pole, commented, "You look PISSED in that shot!"  I wasn't upset or even annoyed, but was more interested in getting a decent shot of the pole than in smiling.  During my morning commute on March 18, I spotted a broken pole on Rohr 1051.  I generally report maintenance concerns such as these to Metro, and so I photographed it with my cell phone in order to be able to accurately describe it on Metro's comment form once I got near a computer.  A friend of mine, in seeing the photo at right where I am trying to photograph the far side of the broken pole, commented, "You look PISSED in that shot!"  I wasn't upset or even annoyed, but was more interested in getting a decent shot of the pole than in smiling.

During my morning commute on March 18, I spotted a broken pole on Rohr 1051.  I generally report maintenance concerns such as these to Metro, and so I photographed it with my cell phone in order to be able to accurately describe it on Metro’s comment form once I got near a computer.  A friend of mine, in seeing the photo at right where I am trying to photograph the far side of the broken pole, commented, “You look PISSED in that shot!”  I wasn’t upset or even annoyed, but was more interested in getting a decent shot of the pole than in smiling.


These two photos are outtakes from a video that Food & Water Watch shot as part of their Take Back the Tap program.  The idea was to create a fake brand of bottled water and see what people thought of the "product", before revealing that it was actually filtered DC municipal tap water that they were drinking.  These two photos are outtakes from a video that Food & Water Watch shot as part of their Take Back the Tap program.  The idea was to create a fake brand of bottled water and see what people thought of the "product", before revealing that it was actually filtered DC municipal tap water that they were drinking.

These two photos are outtakes from a video that Food & Water Watch shot as part of their Take Back the Tap program.  The idea was to create a fake brand of bottled water and see what people thought of the “product”, before revealing that it was actually filtered DC municipal tap water that they were drinking.


The final video.  I’m not in it, but it’s interesting to see the reactions of various passers-by in the video, and the child at the end is adorable.


Multiple fire alarms by different manufacturers at Macy's in Wheaton Plaza.  I wonder what the purpose of that is.  Who knows.

Multiple fire alarms by different manufacturers at Macy’s in Wheaton Plaza.  I wonder what the purpose of that is.  Who knows.

(This is also not the first time I’ve seen two apparently unrelated fire alarm devices next to each other)


Test video during Duckie’s initial acceptance testing.  I am singing “Yo He Ho” from Today’s Special.


After the initial acceptance testing for Duckie, I did a little more testing a week or so later in order to better get the hang of how Duckie worked ahead of its first "real" use.  Thus I tested it on the view off my balcony looking towards the street, my feet while standing on the balcony, looking towards the back of the property, and my television.  After the initial acceptance testing for Duckie, I did a little more testing a week or so later in order to better get the hang of how Duckie worked ahead of its first "real" use.  Thus I tested it on the view off my balcony looking towards the street, my feet while standing on the balcony, looking towards the back of the property, and my television.

After the initial acceptance testing for Duckie, I did a little more testing a week or so later in order to better get the hang of how Duckie worked ahead of its first “real” use.  Thus I tested it on the view off my balcony looking towards the street, my feet while standing on the balcony, looking towards the back of the property, and my television.

After the initial acceptance testing for Duckie, I did a little more testing a week or so later in order to better get the hang of how Duckie worked ahead of its first "real" use.  Thus I tested it on the view off my balcony looking towards the street, my feet while standing on the balcony, looking towards the back of the property, and my television.  After the initial acceptance testing for Duckie, I did a little more testing a week or so later in order to better get the hang of how Duckie worked ahead of its first "real" use.  Thus I tested it on the view off my balcony looking towards the street, my feet while standing on the balcony, looking towards the back of the property, and my television.


On May 1, the small Mavica followed Big Mavica to be recycled.  Unlike Big Mavica, which went out with a bang, the small Mavica went out quietly, as it had been not only surpassed by Big Mavica in 2002, but beginning in 2006, I could take higher-resolution photos with my cell phone.  Then in 2007, I got a new computer without a floppy drive, and that was basically the end of the old Mavica.  So while I was already in the recycling mood with Big Mavica, I quietly sent this one up the same road a few weeks later.

On May 1, the small Mavica followed Big Mavica to be recycled.  Unlike Big Mavica, which went out with a bang, the small Mavica went out quietly, as it had been not only surpassed by Big Mavica in 2002, but beginning in 2006, I could take higher-resolution photos with my cell phone.  Then in 2007, I got a new computer without a floppy drive, and that was basically the end of the old Mavica.  So while I was already in the recycling mood with Big Mavica, I quietly sent this one up the same road a few weeks later.


I think I was trying to explain closing the doors to someone at work, and doodled this picture on the whiteboard.  What you're seeing is a WMATA employee wearing a safety vest and a hat sticking his head out the cab window of a Breda rehab to close the doors, and cursing the fact that he can't get the doors closed.

I think I was trying to explain closing the doors to someone at work, and doodled this picture on the whiteboard.  What you’re seeing is a WMATA employee wearing a safety vest and a hat sticking his head out the cab window of a Breda rehab to close the doors, and cursing the fact that he can’t get the doors closed.


The "Really Really Free Market" was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.

The “Really Really Free Market” was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.

The "Really Really Free Market" was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.  The "Really Really Free Market" was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.

The "Really Really Free Market" was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.  The "Really Really Free Market" was a monthly event put on by an anarchist collective in Dupont Circle during the summer of 2008.  The idea was that of a swap meet, where people brought things that they no longer wanted, and took what they wanted, and no money changed hands.  All in all, it was a fun event.  The first, shown here, took place on May 10.


Videos taken during the Kodak’s acceptance testing.  I am again singing “Yo He Ho” from Today’s Special.


On the third weekend in May, Katie came to visit!  We had a blast, running around DC on Saturday, and going to Arundel Mills on Sunday.  We also put my then-new Kodak Z1012IS digital camera through its paces, as this was the first time it was being taken out in the field as Big Mavica's successor.  Here, Katie smiles on Breda 4007 while we waited to enter a section where Metro was single-tracking.

On the third weekend in May, Katie came to visit!  We had a blast, running around DC on Saturday, and going to Arundel Mills on Sunday.  We also put my then-new Kodak Z1012IS digital camera through its paces, as this was the first time it was being taken out in the field as Big Mavica’s successor.  Here, Katie smiles on Breda 4007 while we waited to enter a section where Metro was single-tracking.


Katie and I discuss the new camera as the train finally gets moving again.  As you can tell, we’re having fun.


This photo of Metro's rules sign on Breda 4007, taken with a high zoom while we were stopped, came out very sharp.  I was impressed with the quality, but would later find out that this was not typical of the Kodak's image quality, which would typically not do well with fine details.

This photo of Metro’s rules sign on Breda 4007, taken with a high zoom while we were stopped, came out very sharp.  I was impressed with the quality, but would later find out that this was not typical of the Kodak’s image quality, which would typically not do well with fine details.


In showing Katie around Dupont Circle on this particular occasion, I showed Katie the building where I work.  And here it is.  I love the building - the lobby is still vintage 1950s, with terrazzo floors and stone walls.

In showing Katie around Dupont Circle on this particular occasion, I showed Katie the building where I work.  And here it is.  I love the building – the lobby is still vintage 1950s, with terrazzo floors and stone walls.


As is typical of Washington in the spring, the place was crawling with school groups.  I generally have a poor view of these groups, since they're rarely well-behaved regardless of where they are.

As is typical of Washington in the spring, the place was crawling with school groups.  I generally have a poor view of these groups, since they’re rarely well-behaved regardless of where they are.


This row of suitcases chained together in front of Dupont Circle intrigued me.  Not so much the suitcases themselves, but the symbols drawn on and located around them.  It intrigued me enough to run it as a photo feature (first Kodak photo feature), but unfortunately, my research into these messages turned up nothing.

This row of suitcases chained together in front of Dupont Circle intrigued me.  Not so much the suitcases themselves, but the symbols drawn on and located around them.  It intrigued me enough to run it as a photo feature (first Kodak photo feature), but unfortunately, my research into these messages turned up nothing.


Horn and light combination spotted on First Street NE in Washington, in front of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.  I certainly knew what that horn sounded like, because a red version of that horn was the fire alarm when I was in middle school, thus I could easily recognize the sound from countless fire drills.

Horn and light combination spotted on First Street NE in Washington, in front of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.  I certainly knew what that horn sounded like, because a red version of that horn was the fire alarm when I was in middle school, thus I could easily recognize the sound from countless fire drills.


Katie checks out the view from the railfan window on Alstom 6129, on the way to Rosslyn.

Katie checks out the view from the railfan window on Alstom 6129, on the way to Rosslyn.

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Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3

Part 1